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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
to a world of education that offered me a new insight into how i saw the world. so, i just wanted to do that for somebody else, that's all. >> reporter: out of thousands of applicants, oprah hand-picked 72 girls. >> do you think i'm good enough to be selected to go to the school? >> i think that you are. good enough. >> reporter: girls from shanty towns. >> 65 million living together in the yard. >> the house that i live in with my mom is very small. >> reporter: girls who experienced trauma and the hardships ingrained in poverty. girls a lot like a young oprah winfrey. >> at the time that i grew up in mississippi, it was very much like south africa. it was apartheid mississippi. it was. and segregated schools, no running water, no electricity. which was just the way, you don't think, oh, gee, everybody else has it and i don't. that's just the way i grew up. it's amazing that i've come from that to my own ipad. >> reporter: the girls and their families understood the life-altering gift of education. >> you will be a part of the very first class of the oprah winfrey -- >> reporter: in a
sacrificed so she and her brother could get an ivy league education. >> i choke up when i talk about this stuff because it is why we're here. >> reporter: needless to say her own daughters inhabit a much different world. sasha is now 11 and malia, a teenager. it's hard enough to be 14 if your parents aren't the president and first lady. how do you help her negotiate that real lly frenc lly teachery of 14? >> we don't do the oh, woe is me thing, she's got a great life, she's got great friends, she's happy. it's kind of hard, especially as we point out, look around. you want to see hardship? you want to see struggle? you don't have it, kid, having the president as your father way down on the list of tough. just like, you'll be fine. >> reporter: she often refers to herself as mom in chief she comes to the role with a high-powered pedigree, graduate of harvard law school he ultimately walked way from her career so her husband could pursue his political ambitions. >> i'm his biggest supporter. >> reporter: are you also, brutally honest? >> i'm honest, absolutely. >> reporter: you think s
to state. and i was floored by the stories i heard. i was educated, consider myself pretty well-informed about a lot of issues. didn't know these stories. >> reporter: she says the stories motivated her and the vice president's wife, jill biden, to create a program called joining forces. they've taken the message to "sesame street." >> it's important to know the people in your neighborhood who serve in the military. >> because they and their families need our support. >> reporter: and to primetime, helping to expand a military center to vets on "extreme makeover: home edition." >> move that bus. >> reporter: but the toughest problems, of course, television cameos cannot solve, like the crushing unemployment rate of returning vets. at 9.7%, it's almost two points worse than the dismal numbers for the rest of americans. >> i won't be satisfied and nor will my husband until every veteran and military spouse who wants a job has one. all of you deserve nothing less. nothing less. >> reporter: she's come to florida today with good news. with encouragement from joining forces, 2,000 co
. >> one senses this harvard educated attorney has trained herself to side step conflict. observe when we asked her about the tape from a private fund raiser where mitt romney said 47% of americans believe they are victims. what do you think we learned about mr. romney in those tapes? >> you know, again, i do not even begin to, you know, get into that kind of back and forth. i do know that barack has made, i think some very eloquent statements about those remarks that i completely agree with. i don't think that i have got any more to add than what he said. >> what is clear to me. >> she learned to measure her word carefully. in february of 2008, she was roundly criticized for comments she made during this speech in wisconsin. >> for the first time in my adult lifetime i'm really proud of my country. >> her remarks ignited a firestorm. >> i am proud of my country. i don't know about you if you hear the word earlier. i am very proud of my country. >> leading to questions about her patriotism. but now with a 65% approval rating, she is seen as a campaign asset, being deployed in swing states
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)